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Lewiston Lions give back to community

by jmaloni

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Tue, Dec 23rd 2014 06:45 pm
At the Lewiston Christmas Walk Dec 6 were Lewiston Lions Tom Huisgen, Marlene Craft, Bruce Gorska, President Regina Cecconi and Theresa White. Not pictured is the photographer, Town of Niagara Lions Club President Angelo Onevelo.
At the Lewiston Christmas Walk Dec 6 were Lewiston Lions Tom Huisgen, Marlene Craft, Bruce Gorska, President Regina Cecconi and Theresa White. Not pictured is the photographer, Town of Niagara Lions Club President Angelo Onevelo.

The Lewiston Community Lions Club's primary goal is to help those in need, especially those within this community. Its members are dedicated to this goal, and volunteer their time and efforts wherever necessary.

This season has been no exception. The Lewiston Lions have been very active within the community, and have had the pleasure of sponsoring several community events.

The Lewiston Lions Club recognizes the contributions senior citizens have made to the success of our communities, and wanted to acknowledge their efforts by sponsoring their Thanksgiving and Christmas luncheon at the Town of Lewiston Senior Center. About 100 seniors were in attendance at each luncheon, along with a few of Lions Club members to show support.

Fresh turkeys also were on the delivery schedule this year. The Lewiston Lions delivered approximately 70 turkeys to the Tuscarora Reservation for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. This tradition is very important to the club. Members seek to provide holiday dinners to as many deserving families as possible.

This year's Lewiston Christmas Walk had no shortage of activities. The Lewiston Community Lions Club, in conjunction with the Town of Niagara Lions, provided free eye photoscreening for any child at the Lewiston Event Center. Those who participated in the screening received a free game of bowling, courtesy of the Lewiston Event Center.

Vision problems affect one in 20 preschoolers, and one in four school children. Without early detection and treatment, children's vision problems can lead to permanent vision loss and learning difficulties.

"This was the first event of its kind between the two clubs, and I hope to bring more like it to the Lewiston community. Eye screenings are extremely important for young children, and could possibly save their sight," said Regina Cecconi, president of the Lewiston Community Lions.

The next free eye photoscreening community event is scheduled for Jan. 10, from noon until 3 p.m. at the Lewiston Library. This free event is for children ages 1-6 years old.

During a photoscreening, the screener uses a special camera to take a picture of a child's eyes. Once the instant photo is developed, it is sent to the Ross Eye Institute in Buffalo, which then analyzes the photo to look for any signs of vision problems. If necessary, The Ross Eye Institute will directly and confidentially contact those examined.

For more information, visit www.lewistoncommunitylionsclub-ny.org.

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