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Marcho Farms Inc. recalls veal, beef & pork products due to possible non-o157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (stec) adulteration

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Mon, May 8th 2017 11:35 am

Marcho Farms Inc., a Souderton (Pennsylvania) establishment, is recalling approximately 5,620 pounds of boneless veal, and ground veal, beef and pork products that may be adulterated withnon-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O111, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced.

The veal, beef and pork products were produced on April 11 and April 14, 2017. The following products are subject to recall:

  • 60-pound cases of "veal boneless trimmings halal" with case code "5398" and "manfu. date" of "04/11/2017"
  • 60 pound cases of "veal trimmings USDA Choice" with case code "98" and "manfu. date" of "04/11/17"
  • 9-pound cases of "veal, beef, pork ground for meatloaf" with case code "3122" and "sell by" date "05/05/17"
  • 10-pound cases of "veal, beef, pork ground for meatloaf bulk pack" with case code "3125"

These items were distributed to retail stores and food service locations in Illinois, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Virginia.

The problem was discovered when the Illinois State Meat Inspection Service notified FSIS on May 2 about positive non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) samples made with source material produced by Marcho Farms. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.

Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) outbreaks are rare, but tend to primarily be due to contaminated food and person-to-person transmission. Like E. coli O157:H7, non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps two to eight days (three to four days, on average) after exposure the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5 years old and older adults. It is marked by easy bruising, pallor, and decreased urine output. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS and the company are concerned that some product may be frozen and in consumers' freezers.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify, and recalling firms notify their customers of the recall and that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers. When available, the retail distribution list(s) will be posted on the FSIS website, www.fsis.usda.gov/recalls.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume ground beef that has been cooked to a temperature of 160° F. The only way to confirm ground beef is cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature, http://1.usa.gov/1cDxcDQ

Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Herb Nicolo, Marcho Farms Inc.'s plant manager, at 215-721-7131.

Consumers with food safety questions can "Ask Karen," the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov or via smartphone at m.askkaren.gov. The toll-free USDA meat and poultry hotline 1-888-mphotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) weekdays. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day. The online Electronic Consumer Complaint Monitoring System can be accessed 24 hours a day at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/reportproblem.

Preparing Product For Safe Consumption

USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline

1-888-MPHOTLINE or visit

www.fsis.usda.gov

√ Wash hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry. Wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot, soapy water. Immediately clean spills.

√ Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat, poultry and egg products and cooked foods. 

√ Color is not a reliable indicator that meat has been cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria.

√ The only way to be sure the meat or poultry is cooked to a high enough temperature to kill harmful bacteria is to use a thermometer to measure the internal temperature. Recommended temperatures are:

•Fish: 145°F

•Beef, pork, lamb chops/steaks/roasts: 145°F with a three-minute rest time

•Ground meat: 160°F

•Poultry: 165°F

•Hot dogs: 160°F or steaming hot 

Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase or one hour if temperatures exceed 90º F. Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking.

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