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Remembering Gary Raby Sr.

Sat, Jan 28th 2017 07:00 am

By Jennifer and Gary Raby Jr.

Coach Gary Raby Sr. goes by many names. No matter what you call him, though, you can't deny his heart of gold. He taught us so much in his life that sadly was cut too short last week while he was surrounded by his loving family at Hospice House. He will, however, continue to inspire us to believe in ourselves every day.

Growing up, our dad always exemplified positivity and kindness to all. He inspired so many to use this philosophy in life. When it came to running, competition never mattered to him because, no matter what team you were on, he had a high-five ready. He taught us to respect and cheer each other on for the hard work that goes into running races, especially when there was a hill involved. He always turned a negative into a positive (such as "Hills are your friends, so don't be afraid to push yourself).

One thing he made sure to teach to his athletes is that winning isn't everything. It's about becoming a better person and learning to live a healthy lifestyle. He had three rules that summed up his coaching philosophy: Family comes first, then academics, and lastly running. He taught you that running was fun, but you need to put your family first, because that is what will make your life complete. He also made sure we understood that achieving a higher education was a goal you should set, and be proud to showcase your intelligence.

When he took over the Lewiston-Porter cross-country program, he took a program that was neglected and he re-built it from the ground up. He did so much and never once did he make the program and its success about him. He always made the program about the athletes, and building life lessons everyone can use. Be positive, kind, and always believe in yourself is what he strived to teach.

The most recognized attribute he showcased was his passion through the high-five. He has given so many high-fives, because he believed in every athlete, and he wanted the athletes to see how much he cared about everyone.

He truly was one of a kind and he will never be forgotten.

Remembering Gary Raby Sr.

By Jennifer and Gary Raby Jr.

Coach Gary Raby Sr. goes by many names. No matter what you call him, though, you can't deny his heart of gold. He taught us so much in his life that sadly was cut too short last week while he was surrounded by his loving family at Hospice House. He will, however, continue to inspire us to believe in ourselves every day.

Growing up, our dad always exemplified positivity and kindness to all. He inspired so many to use this philosophy in life. When it came to running, competition never mattered to him because, no matter what team you were on, he had a high-five ready. He taught us to respect and cheer each other on for the hard work that goes into running races, especially when there was a hill involved. He always turned a negative into a positive (such as "Hills are your friends, so don't be afraid to push yourself).

One thing he made sure to teach to his athletes is that winning isn't everything. It's about becoming a better person and learning to live a healthy lifestyle. He had three rules that summed up his coaching philosophy: Family comes first, then academics, and lastly running. He taught you that running was fun, but you need to put your family first, because that is what will make your life complete. He also made sure we understood that achieving a higher education was a goal you should set, and be proud to showcase your intelligence.

When he took over the Lewiston-Porter cross-country program, he took a program that was neglected and he re-built it from the ground up. He did so much and never once did he make the program and its success about him. He always made the program about the athletes, and building life lessons everyone can use. Be positive, kind, and always believe in yourself is what he strived to teach.

The most recognized attribute he showcased was his passion through the high-five. He has given so many high-fives, because he believed in every athlete, and he wanted the athletes to see how much he cared about everyone.

He truly was one of a kind and he will never be forgotten.

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