NFPTV: 'Mummies of the World' on display at the Buffalo Museum of Science

"Mummies of the World: The Exhibition" is one of the largest exhibitions of mummies and related artifacts ever assembled. This groundbreaking exhibition opened April 12 at the Buffalo Museum of Science and features a never-before-seen collection of objects and specimens, including real human and animal mummies and related artifacts from South America, Europe and Egypt.

Learn more in our NFPTV video segment:

 

"Mummies of the World" bridges the gap between past and present, showing how science can shed light on history, the study of medicine and cultures around the world. It also demonstrates that mummification - both through natural and intentional processes - has taken place all over the globe, from the hot desert sands of South America to remote European bogs.

"Mummies of the World" is a fascinating mix of old and new, including engaging interactive multi-media activities that illustrate how the tools of modern science enable researchers to study mummies in new and non-destructive ways, allowing unprecedented insights into past cultures and civilizations. It highlights real advances in the scientific methods used to study mummies, including computer tomography, ancient DNA analysis and radiocarbon dating, all of which allow researchers to learn about the lives, history and cultures of the mummies. The exhibition offers visitors state-of-the-art multimedia and hands-on interactive stations to understand how mummies are created, where they come from, who they were and how they lived.

>>Plan a visit

•"Mummies of the World: The Exhibition" has partnered with the Buffalo Museum of Science and The Buffalo History Museum to include Buffalo's own collections on the blockbuster tour.

The Buffalo Museum of Science and The Buffalo History Museum are among the 12 world-renowned loaning institutions and private collectors coming together to make the exhibition possible. The collection of mummies and associated artifacts joining the tour includes: A late 19th century Mundrucu trophy head from Amazonia that was brought to Buffalo as part of the Pan American Exposition in 1901; an Egyptian wrapped human head; the mummified remains of a falcon; and shrunken heads from Ecuador. 

Additionally, the South American child mummy, who underwent Roswell Park Cancer Institute's first mummy CT scan, will join the exhibition. The results from the CT scan, announced in the coming weeks, will be used in "Mummies of the World" to give visitors insight into the life of the young child. 

•The Buffalo Museum of Science is located at 1020 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo.

For more information, call 716-896-5200
 or visit http://www.sciencebuff.org.